How to Prepare for a New Step on Your Career Path


A few posts ago on this blog, I shared some tips for identifying your career development needs. If that post was relevant to you, by now you’ve hopefully been working hard on your personal development and are starting to think about taking the next step on your career path. Of course not everyone wants a promotion, but if you’re ambitious and know you have more to offer than your current position permits, the following tips will help you begin preparations for a step up in your company hierarchy.   Make Sure You’ve Been Playing Your A Game In my previous post on this topic (How to Identify Your Career Development Needs), I suggested that in addition to following the tips provided, you should make the effort to become known as someone who exceeds expectations. I had a good reason for mentioning this. Plenty of misguided employees reach a point where they believe a promotion is due, regardless of their current performance. Here comes the reality check. A senior manager in your company is not going to consider an employee for promotion unless that employee has excelled—every day—in her current role. You’ll not be perceived as someone ready to be promoted into a bigger job if you aren’t acing the one you have. That’s why the first step in preparing to advance your career path is to play your A game and consistently exceed what’s expected of you.   Prepare Yourself for the Role You Want If you’ve excelled in your current position, you won’t be a position where you are overwhelmed. Therefore you’ll have some available bandwidth to take on additional tasks. Use that bandwidth to research the role you plan to move into (presumably you have a role in mind and aren’t just setting your sites on “any promotion”). When you’ve done your research, refer back to my...

How to Beat Executive Loneliness


Are you a company CEO or executive leader? If you are, you can probably relate to what rates as one of the most commonly reported problems faced by senior business leaders—loneliness. Despite all the people that surround you in your business life, your position is one that can easily place you in a position of isolation or at least, a position where you feel disconnected and lonely. Left unchecked, this executive loneliness can lead to deterioration in performance at work and even to emotional and physical health issues.   Rob’s Tips to Combat Executive Loneliness Rob O’Byrne knows what it’s like to experience executive loneliness. Having spent nearly 20 years as the head of Logistics Bureau Group, he’s been through his own periods of isolation and has known many other executives who’ve fought their own battles with loneliness. It’s a very real issue, but one that can be overcome with the right know-how. The following tips should prove helpful if you’ve experienced executive loneliness for yourself. If you haven’t, then the advice is still worth noting. Prevention is definitely better than cure when it comes to emotional isolation, which can otherwise settle like a dark cloud while you are too busy to notice, and then begin to wear you down inexorably.   Build your own personal support team This is the best preventative measure you can take and is not something that should wait until you start to experience executive loneliness. Start with the one person who you are most comfortable confiding in. This might be your spouse, partner, best friend or even a therapist. The most important thing is to be able to share your work-related problems and fears with somebody. Next, you should turn to those you have relied upon as mentors in the past. If you have no existing mentors, it’s time to start seeking some....